RNs - South Africa

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MPs leave nurses feeling angry and undervalued again

Terry Bell, Business Report, November 4, 2005

Nurses around the country who consider themselves undervalued are even angrier this week because of what many see as another illustration of how they are taken for granted.

This time it is parliamentarians who are in the firing line. On Tuesday, when the long-awaited and controversial Nursing Bill came before the national assembly, it could not be voted on because there were too few MPs to make up a quorum. ... MPs

Woman told to 'drag baby'

Sanri van Wyk, News24, November 4, 2005

Bethlehem - A young mother filed a charge with police after she lost her twins when two nurses allegedly forced her to walk from one room to another despite the fact that she was already in labour.

She apparently also had to drag her one baby, who had already dropped to the floor, behind her.

Police and hospital management have ordered an investigation. ... Woman

Smile Week: spreading joy and good health

Jillian Green, The Star, November 3, 2005

Eight nurses at Johannesburg Hospital's ward 275 are run off their feet with 39 patients to attend to, but they're not complaining.

The ward is being used for admissions and recovery of children being operated on as part of The Star Smile Fund's annual Smile Week, as well as fulfilling its normal functions.

It has been a hive of activity since Sunday, when the first batch were admitted. ... Smile

Nurses need a new deal if we are to cure health woes

Ruth Rabinowitz, Cape Times, November 3, 2005

What do we want of our nurses? That they be compassionate, compe-tent and accountable.

They don't have to be Florence Nightingale, but they should not be like the nurse who sent a mother away with her asthmatic baby to punish her for not bringing her clinic card, leaving the baby to die at home.

How do we create good nurses?

By building a framework that gives them pride in their work;

By giving them a safe and supportive environment, both physically and emotionally;

By giving them job satisfaction; ... Nurses

Shame on you, Mqanduli

Dispatch Editorial, October 28, 2005

Here is a story for the people of Mqanduli. This story takes place far away and a long time ago.

It is 1854 in Scutari, an area outside what was then Constantinople, and in the middle of the Crimean War as Britain, France and Turkey battled Russia.

A woman arrived at Scutari's British Army Barrack Hospital along with 38 nurses but the male doctors of the day turned them away.

Less than two weeks later, flooded with casualties from the front, those British doctors had to turn back to the nurses they had shunned to help save scores of lives. ... Shame

Goqwana rushes to nurses' aid

Private guards hired after residents and workers threaten to kill Zulu medics.
Luxolo Tyali, Dispatch, October 27, 2005

A private security company has been hired to protect 21 Zulu nurses from KwaZulu-Natal working at Zitulele Hos-pital near Mqanduli, after they received death threats from the community.

This comes as Health MEC Bevan Goqwana had to leave yesterday's provincial Legislature meeting to fly to Zitulele to beg the frightened nurses not to leave the province.

On Tuesday, police were called in after local residents and workers at the hospital threatened to kill one of the nurses. ... Goqwana

Security firm hired to protect nurses

South African Broadcasting Corporation, October 27, 2005

Monwabisi Goqwana, the Eastern Cape health MEC, has beefed up security at the Zitulele Hospital at Mqanduli in the Transkei region to protect 21 nurses from KwaZulu-Natal following threats to their lives.

Goqwana says a private security firm has been hired to protect the nurses who were called in to help with staff shortages at the hospital. They have received threats from their peers and members of the community who are unhappy with their presence at the institution. ... Security

Nurses continue to get threats, security increased

South African Broadcasting Corporation, October 27, 2005

Monwabisi Goqwana, the Eastern Cape health MEC, has beefed up security at Zitulele Hospital at Mqanduli. Goqwana says a private security firm has been hired to protect the 21 nurses from KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo as they continue to receive threats from the members of the community and their peers. The community want their own people to be employed at the hospital.

The nurses allege that threats were made on their lives while on duty. ... Nurses

Health minister treats nurses with disdain

Dianne Kohler Barnard, The Mercury, October 25, 2005

While on the one hand the minister of health has implored medical professionals to remain in the country, on the other hand her every action seems to be telling them that they will only be treated with disdain if they choose to stay.

The Nursing Bill, which is being debated by the portfolio committee on health, encapsulates exactly why the minister's attitude towards health professionals is so problematic.

South Africans are fully aware of this country's medical brain drain crisis. ... Health

Community threatens nurses

SAPA, October 24, 2005

Cape Town - The Eastern Cape health department has expressed concern at what it says is intimidation of specially-recruited nurses at a hospital in the Mqanduli district.

Department spokesperson Sizwe Kupelo said the six nurses were recruited to Zithulele Hospital from KwaZulu-Natal as part of the drive to overcome the province's chronic shortage of health professionals in rural areas.

"We are being told they're being threatened by community members," he said. "There's a report one of the nurses was held hostage in the hospital, also allegedly by community members. ... Community

No democracy in Nursing Bill discussion - MP

Sapa, October 19, 2005

Parliament – Democratic Alliance MP Dianne Kohler-Barnard accused the ANC on Wednesday of riding roughshod over concerns raised about the draft Nursing Bill, now before Parliament.
“There was no democracy in committee room 201 in Parliament today, when the portfolio committee on health, having spent just two and a half days listening to the opinions of the entire nursing profession, then chose to ignore their views completely,” she said after the meeting.

Nursing organisations representing about 180 000 nurses in South Africa had expressed strong reservations about aspects of the bill. ... No

Nursing Bill a bitter pill for health professionals

Dianne Kohler Barnard, Cape Times, October 18, 2005

While on the one hand Minister of Health Manto Tshabalala-Msimang has implored medical professionals to remain in the country, on the other hand her every action seems to be telling them they will only be treated with disdain if they choose to stay here.

The Nursing Bill, which is being debated by the portfolio committee on health, encapsulates why the minister's attitude towards health professionals is so problematic. South Africans are aware of this country's medical brain-drain crisis. ... Nursing

Nurses 'need to be convinced'

News24.com, October 6, 2005

Johannesburg - More than a foreign visit was needed to lure back South African nurses working in the UK, a health sector union told Health Minister Manto Tshabalala-Msimang on Wednesday.

"A mere visit to the UK to convince nurses in Britain to come back, without a clear comprehensive plan, discussed and adopted by stakeholders, will fail," said the National Education, Health and Allied Workers Union (Nehawu).

Tshabalala-Msimang met about 200 South African nurses during a visit to the UK last month, and urged them to return home to work in provincial hospitals. ... Nurses

Will our nurses ever come home?

Lunga Madlala, journalism.co.za, September 16, 2005

South African nurses are deserting our shores in search of a monetary shot in the arm due to poor pay and working conditions, several media reports have noted recently.

According to a City Press article on September 4, getting ill nowadays could be more serious than ever, especially if you're from the Eastern Cape. ... Will our nurses

SA continues to lose embattled nurses to better pay

Kerry Cullinan, iafrica.com, September 16, 2005

“I see a minimum of 60 patients a day, many days up to 100,” says Sister Jaconuum Cupido, who works in a primary health clinic in Springbok in the Northern Cape.

Cupido cares for a wide range of needs from pregnant women to psychiatric patients.

Work pressure has increased substantially on primary health care nurses like Cupido since government moved from expensive hospital-based care to clinic-based primary health care (PHC).

But it is at these clinics that staff shortages are often felt most acutely. ... SA continues to lose

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